1.  
Rush Att
256
Rush Yds
1133
Rush TD
8
Rush Avg
4.4
Rec
56
Rec Yds
512
Rec TD
3
Rec Avg
9.1
If any player could be said to have hit the jackpot in the 2020 NFL Draft, it's Edwards-Helaire. Selected by the Chiefs at the end of the first round, the dynamic running back moves from one championship squad to another after he helped LSU to an undefeated season in 2019. At 5-7, 207, Edwards-Helaire was widely seen as the best receiving back in this year's draft class, but he's far from one-dimensional as his power, low center of gravity, elusiveness and vision make him difficult to bring to the ground. Another back with a similar skill set, Brian Westbrook, thrived under Andy Reid in Philadelphia, and CEH seems likely to see a significant role right away in Kansas City's supercharged offense, given the draft capital used to acquire him. Damien Williams initially remained atop the depth chart, but his decision to opt out of the 2020 season could leave Edwards-Helaire unchallenged for the lead backfield role. The upside scenario probably looks similar to what Kareem Hunt did for the Chiefs in 2017 and 2018.
2.  
RB  IND
Rush Att
265
Rush Yds
1241
Rush TD
9
Rush Avg
4.7
Rec
34
Rec Yds
277
Rec TD
1
Rec Avg
8.1
The latest in a long line of Wisconsin RBs with impressive college resumes, Taylor was the second player in FBS history to post consecutive 2,000-yard rushing seasons (after Iowa State's Troy Davis) and the second to win consecutive Doak Walker awards (after Darren McFadden). Taylor is a premier physical specimen, running a 4.39 40 at the combine at a rock-solid 226 pounds. That combination of size and speed allows him to bowl over defenders while also providing a home-run threat. Taylor even showed improvement as a receiver in 2019, and his balance and power through contact make him more than just a scheme-dependent weapon. His hands are a concern, however, both in terms of fumbles - 18 on 968 touches at Wisconsin - and drops. Taylor's mammoth college workload could also impact his shelf life in the NFL, and like many Badger RBs, the patience he developed behind a dominant offensive line won't always serve him well in the NFL. Fortunately, he landed with an Indianapolis squad that has a strong argument for best O-line in the league. The downside of Taylor's new home is that he'll have tough competition for both carries and targets, with Marlon Mack in the mix for the former and Nyheim Hines likely accounting for a good portion of the latter. Taylor should eventually get a big workload, but it isn't clear if that will happen Week 1, midseason or in 2021.
3.  
RB  LAR
Rush Att
163
Rush Yds
727
Rush TD
5
Rush Avg
4.5
Rec
50
Rec Yds
454
Rec TD
1
Rec Avg
9.1
Akers was essentially a one-man show in a moribund Florida State offense during his college career, but that experience may have prepared him well for a three-down role in the pros. A strong, compact runner at 5-10, 217, with the power to be an asset in short-yardage situations, Akers ran a 4.47 40 at the combine, showing he can be more than just a grinder. His good vision makes him dangerous in the open field, though he seems to prefer running through tacklers rather than slipping by them. Akers is also a capable receiver, catching 30 of 42 targets for 225 yards and four scores last season. With Todd Gurley off to Atlanta, Akers has an opportunity to make an immediate impact. A backfield committee wouldn't be surprising, though, with holdovers Darrell Henderson and Malcolm Brown also looking for touches. But of the trio, Akers' skill set makes him the most likely to secure a true lead role.
4.  
RB  DET
Rush Att
197
Rush Yds
851
Rush TD
5
Rush Avg
4.3
Rec
35
Rec Yds
284
Rec TD
1
Rec Avg
8.1
Georgia's recent track record of producing quality NFL runnings backs is outstanding, and Swift seems ready to be the next Bulldog to follow in the footsteps of Todd Gurley, Nick Chubb and Sony Michel. Despite his name, Swift's calling card is not elite speed, though he ran a 4.48 in the 40-yard dash at the combine. He mostly relies on a dynamic blend of vision, footwork and football IQ that makes it difficult for the initial defender to bring him down, or even the second or third would-be tackler. Swift seemingly understands how to get the most out of his blockers, and he adds good receiving skills. Like many rookie running backs, he needs to improve his pass protection, and a lack of pile-moving power could deny him short-yardage opportunities, but he nonetheless offers three-down potential long term. It's less clear that he'll actually have that opportunity this season, coming in as the 35th overall pick to a Detroit backfield that already has 2018 second-rounder Kerryon Johnson. The Lions even added another running back in the fifth round - 193-pound Jason Huntley - to compete with Ty Johnson and Bo Scarbrough at the bottom of their depth chart, and the team additionally saw fit to bring in Adrian Peterson just prior to Week 1. Swift looks like the closet thing the team has to a complete package in the backfield, but he'll likely be part of a two- or three-man committee at least to begin the season.
5.  
RB  BAL
Rush Att
205
Rush Yds
902
Rush TD
6
Rush Avg
4.4
Rec
29
Rec Yds
236
Rec TD
1
Rec Avg
8.1
A three-year starter at Ohio State, Dobbins is a chiseled 5-9, 209, with enough strength to punish tacklers and more than enough speed to run past them. While a nagging ankle injury kept him from fully participating at the combine, his workouts as an 18-year-old coming out of high school were eye-popping (he ran a 4.45 40, and his 43.1-inch vertical would have been second highest by a college RB since 2006). He also flashed plenty of breakaway speed at Ohio State, leading the nation last season with 31 runs of 15-plus yards. Dobbins even showed some ability as a receiver and pass protector, cementing his status as a potential three-down option in the NFL. This season, he'll likely be part of a backfield committee for Baltimore, which drafted him 55th overall. The Ravens led the league with 596 rush attempts last season and set a NFL record with 3,296 rushing yards, but it was quarterback Lamar Jackson who led the way with 37 percent of the yardage and a third of the touchdowns, leaving Mark Ingram, Gus Edwards and Justice Hill with a combined 393 carries for 1,954 yards and 14 TDs. That's still big-time production, no doubt, but it'll be tough for Dobbins to take more than half of the pie as a rookie, considering Ingram, Edwards and Hill remain on the roster.
Want to see our full fantasy football rankings?

We rank hundreds of players, but only paid RotoWire subscribers have access to our full rookie rankings. This is just one of many features you'll unlock to if you decide to subscribe.

Unlock Our Full Rankings Unlock Our Full Rankings